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Arizona Smokers’ Hotline


The Quit Life

42 Facts About How Smoking Affects Your Health

Check out the top statistics about how tobacco and smoking cigarettes can seriously harm your health:

General Health Effect Facts

1. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death.1

2. Smoking leads to disease and disability.1

3. Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body.1

4. Smoking can affect bone health.5

5. Smoking causes negative effects on the body, including inflammation (swelling) and decreased immune function (your body’s protection system).5

6. Smoking affects the health of your teeth and gums and can cause tooth loss.5

7. Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower.5

8. Smoking makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up.5


Men’s Health

9. Smoking can affect men’s sperm, which can reduce fertility and increase risks for birth defects and miscarriage (pregnancy loss).5

10. Men with prostate cancer who smoke may be more likely to die from the disease than nonsmokers.2


Women’s Health

11. Women past childbearing years who smoke have weaker bones and are at greater risk for broken bones than women who never smoked.5


Effects on Lifespan

12. Life expectancy for smokers is at least 10 years shorter than for nonsmokers.7

13. Quitting smoking lowers your risk for smoking-related diseases and can add years to your life.5

14. Quitting smoking before the age of 40 reduces the risk of dying from smoking-related disease by about 90%.7

 

Statistics About Diseases Caused By Smoking

15. More than 16 million people already have at least one disease from smoking.2

16. Smoking increases a person’s risk of getting tuberculosis (a type of lung disease) and dying from it.2

17. Smokers are 30% – 40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers.2

18. Smoking can increase your risk for cataracts (a type of eye disease).5

19. Smoking can cause age-related macular degeneration (a type of eye disease).5

20. Smoking is a cause of rheumatoid arthritis (joint swelling).5

21. Smoking increases the risk for stroke, heart attack, vascular disease and aneurysm.3

22. Smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop heart disease, stroke and lung cancer.5

23. Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease (disease in the heart and blood vessels).5

24. Estimates show smoking increases the risk of:5

  • Coronary heart disease by 2-4 times
  • Stroke by 2-4 times
  • Developing lung cancer by 25 times


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – a group of lung diseases that make it hard to breathe.

25. Nearly 8 out of 10 COPD deaths are a result of smoking.2

26. Women smokers are up to 40 times more likely to develop COPD than women who have never smoked.2

27. Smokers are 12-13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers.5


Tobacco and Cancer Facts

28. Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body.5

29. Tobacco use is linked with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, cervix, kidney, ureter, bladder and bone marrow (leukemia).3

30. Smoking causes many other types of cancer, including cancers of the throat, mouth, nasal cavity, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder and cervix, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.2

31. Smokeless tobacco causes cancer of the mouth, esophagus and pancreas.6

32. Cigarette smoking can be blamed for about one-third of all cancer deaths.3


Lung Cancer

33. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the United States.2

34. Smoking causes about 90% of all lung cancer deaths.5

35. More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer.5

 

Tobacco Related Death Facts

36. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year.4

37. Since 1964, more than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking.2

38. Cigarette smoking increases risk for death from all causes in men and women.5

39. Smoking is the leading cause of fire-related deaths—more than 600 deaths each year.3

40. Smoking causes more deaths each year than the following causes combined:5

  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Illegal drug use
  • Alcohol use
  • Motor vehicle injuries
  • Firearm-related incidents

41. More than 10 times as many U.S. citizens have died prematurely from cigarette smoking than have died in all the wars fought by the United States.5

42. The risk of dying from cigarette smoking has increased over the last 50 years in the U.S.5

 

Benefits of Quitting

The good news is that the benefits of quitting start right away.

After quitting:

  • Your heart rate drops back to normal within 20 minutes.
  • Lung function improves and risk of heart attack drops within 2-3 months.
  • Your risk of coronary heart disease is half of a smoker’s within 1 year.
  • Your risk of having a stroke is reduced to that of a smoker’s and risk of getting mouth, throat and esophageal cancer is half of a smoker’s within 5-15 years.
  • Your risk of dying from lung cancer and getting bladder cancer is half of a smoker’s within 10 years.
  • Your risk of coronary heart disease becomes the same as a nonsmoker’s within 15 years.

 Sources

  1. “Fast Facts and Fact Sheets.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 9 February 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/ Accessed 20 May 2017.
  2. “Tobacco Facts and Figures.” BeTobaccoFree.gov. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. https://betobaccofree.hhs.gov/about-tobacco/facts-figures/ Accessed 20 May 2017.
  3. “Tobacco, Nicotine and E-Cigarettes.” NIDA For Teens. National Institute on Drug Abuse, 14 May 2017. https://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/tobacco-nicotine-e-cigarettes Accessed 20 May 2017.
  4. “Burden of Tobacco Use in the U.S.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 11 April 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/resources/data/cigarette-smoking-in-united-states.html Accessed 20 May 2017.
  5. “Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 15 May 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/effects_cig_smoking/index.htm Accessed 20 May 2017.
  6. “Smokeless Tobacco: Health Effects.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 1 December 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/smokeless/health_effects/index.htm Accessed 20 May 2017.
  7. “Tobacco-Related Mortality.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 1 December 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/index.htm Accessed 20 May 2017.
  8. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.

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